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dc.contributor.authorEdwards, James Don
dc.contributor.authorHermanson, Roger H.
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-10T10:26:34Z
dc.date.available2017-07-10T10:26:34Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12284/71
dc.descriptionThis book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Licenseen_US
dc.description.abstractmagine that you have graduated from college without taking an accounting course. You are employed by a company as a sales person, and you eventually become the sales manager of a territory. While attending a sales managers' meeting, financial results are reviewed by the Vice President of Sales and terms such as gross margin percentage, cash flows from operating activities, and LIFO inventory methods are being discussed. The Vice President eventually asks you to discuss these topics as they relate to your territory. You try to do so, but it is obvious to everyone in the meeting that you do not know what you are talking about. Accounting principles courses teach you the "language of business" so you understand terms and concepts used in business decisions. If you understand how accounting information is prepared, you will be in an even stronger position when faced with a management decision based on accounting information. The importance of transactions analysis and proper recording of transactions has clearly been demonstrated in some of the recent business failures that have been reported in the press. If the financial statements of an enterprise are to properly represent the results of operations and the financial condition of the company, the transactions must be analyzed and recorded in the accounts following generally accepted accounting principles. The debits and credits are important not only to accounting majors but also to those entering or engaged in a business career to become managers because the ultimate effects of these journal entries are reflected in the financial statements. If expenses are reported as assets, liabilities and their related expenses are omitted from the financial statements, or reported revenues are recorded prematurely or do not really exist, the financial statements are misleading. The financial statements are only useful and meaningful if they are fair and clearly represent the business events of the company. We wrote this text to give you an understanding of how to use accounting information to analyze business performance and make business decisions. The text takes a business perspective. We use the annual reports of real companies to illustrate many of the accounting concepts. You are familiar with many of the companies we use, such as The Limited, The Home Depot, and Coca-Cola Company. Gaining an understanding of accounting terminology and concepts, however, is not enough to ensure your success. You also need to be able to find information on the Internet, analyze various business situations, work effectively as a member of a team, and communicate your ideas clearly. This text was developed to help you develop these skills.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Global Text Project is funded by the Jacobs Foundation, Zurich, Switzerland. Endeavour International Corporation, Houston, Texas, USA.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherEndeavour International Corporation, Houston, Texas, USAen_US
dc.relation.ispartofseriesVolume;1
dc.subjectManagerial Accountingen_US
dc.subjectBusiness and Leadershipen_US
dc.titleAccounting Principlesen_US
dc.title.alternativeA Business Perspectiveen_US
dc.typeBooken_US


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